Holiday season on Womack Creek, Tate’s Hell

 

 

Womack Creek, a tributary of the Ochlockonee River, on the west side of Tate’s Hell State Forest, has only native plants and trees.  There are three varieties of native hollies on that creek: Yaupon, Dahoon and American holly.  The American holly is what is what folks usually associate with holly, with its prickly scalloped leaves (above).

As in most natural habitats (as compared to managed landscapes) every year is a mix of blooms and seeds.  Some years the white flowers of one or the other holly is more pronounced.  But that doesn’t guarantee that that particular species will have more red berries  — between March to December anything can happen.

This year there were more red berries on the American holly than we have ever seen since 2012. 

Usually, the dahoon holly is the dominant and heavy bearers on the creek.  The bushes are not as full of berries as in previous years.

Yaupon holly, part of the pharmocopeia of native Americans, with its smaller leaves, tiny flowers and smaller berries, is less showy.

To the careful observer,  the red berries of the parsley haw tree can be seen.  That tree is increasing in numbers as the hornbeam trees are losing their grip on the land and landing in the water.

 

Swamp rose blooms were sparse this year, but a few matured to add reds to the creek’s palate of colors.

 

 

 

 

Ever season has its dominant colors; every year that mix changes.

 

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